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How do I know what Ceremony and Reception Site is best for my Wedding?
Simply Weddings Las Vegas │ Las Vegas Wedding Planner

This is one of the most important decisions to make at the beginning of your planning stages for your special day. Finding the right location for your ceremony and reception is the foundation to begin your wedding planning process. Once the location has been selected everything will fall into place.

There are several factors that go into deciding the best location for your ceremony and reception and usually cost is the first and foremost on your wedding check list. Everyone wants a beautiful setting but the question is can you afford it? Location costs can go anywhere from free at a family or friends residence to $25,000 for a luxury estate. Whether your location is free or costs a pretty penny there are a few items you need to take into consideration before signing your venue contract.

  1. How big is the venue?
  2. When is it available?
  3. What are your peak week days? Most venues will have their peak days for weddings on Friday and Saturdays. Ask the venue if you book with them on an off date if there will be a discount, such as a Sunday, Thursday or a mid day wedding reception.
  4. Can the site accommodate a ceremony and reception? Every location will have a maximum capacity. Some separate their capacities by indoor and outdoor events and by ceremonies and receptions. Make sure that this question is at the top of your list. Make sure that they can accommodate for your entire wedding party.

Hotels, Halls, Tents, and Mansions can accommodate the bigger receptions. Wineries, small estates and private residences frequently have limited space.

  1. Don’t forget to ask what’s included in their site fee? One would think with a $15,000 dollar site fee several things would be included in that price? Not essentially. The more sought after sites usually will charge more. Often sites will include things like tables and chairs, maybe even white or ivory linens.

Venues that are already set up for catering, such as hotels or community halls usually have thrown

the basics: linens, tables, chairs, plates and utensils. Private residences and estates are at the top of the list when it comes to high cost receptions. They usually do not have the space or the desire to keep rentals on hand so you have to bring or rent everything for the event and this could cost you a good chunk of change.

  1. What are the restrictions? When reading through a location contract you will always see a section of restrictions. This is to protect everyone involved. Some may a little silly, but they are rarely negotiable. Sound ordinance could also be listed in your restrictions area. Make sure you check the times and make sure it corresponds with your desired wedding day timeline.
  2. Alcohol: Some site may not allow a full bar and some may only allow beer and wine. These venues have it written on their insurance rider that guests cannot bring outside alcohol onto the premises. Usually you can get away with wine or beer. Just check if you are considering a full bar. Some venues may insists that you provide a shuttle or valet service as parking is restricted or perhaps that property is hard to get to.

Always come up with a Plan B. No one likes to think about their wedding day not being perfect but make sure the site is set up for changes from Mother Nature or anything else thrown your way. If any part of your event is outdoors make sure you have a backup plan. Can you rent a tent? Can you move the party inside? What is the last date to cancel? If you do cancel, do you get any of your deposit back? You probably won’t need to act on any of these but just in case you’ll be prepared. I always say go with your gut and envision yourself, family and friends and your fiancé being there . If you have the fortunate situation that you can’t decide between two or three locations go with what feels right. Whatever you choose the venue will set the stage of what’s to come.